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The Cost Of Bike Touring: Africa

Posted February 7th, 2012

How much will an independent bike tour cost?

Costs can be surprisingly high in Africa. It’s definitely not as cheap as Southeast Asia, for example, but careful travellers might get by on $10-20 U.S. a day, depending on which country you’re touring in.

Scroll down to read about bike tourists who’ve recently been there, and their experiences.

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The Cyclist & The Trip: Peter set out to cycle from England to South Africa in August 2009. His slow pace of travel meant that he was nearly (but not quite) in South Africa by early 2012. He’s a fairly low budget traveller but will pay a bit more for a certain level of comfort.

Peter Gostelow

The Cost: About $10 U.S. per person, per day but with a big variation between countries. “Some days can be $5 U.S. or less if I’m camping in villages and self-catering. Others can easily be over $20 U.S. a day.”

I’m somewhere between an ultra low-budget traveller and a medium budget one. On previous trips, I’d have checked out of a $4-5 U.S. room to stay in a $3 U.S. place. Now I can’t be bothered.

Tips: “Wherever there are backpacker places in Africa, expect the food to be sometimes twice the price of what it would cost on the street or market. Budget eating is not to be found in places that market themselves as budget accommodation options. If you know the place you are going to camp is some kilometres from the market, make sure you stock up rather than having to pay $5-10 U.S. for a meal that might still leave you hungry. Also, food (particularly fruit and vegetables) sold by the roadside in villages is far cheaper than what you will find in a market in a large town or city.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Shane began cycling the length of Africa in late 2011. He shared costs related to the first part of his trip through South Africa. During this section of the journey, he cooked almost all his own food but his budget was inflated by accommodation costs. Shane spent about 30% of his nights in hotels or hostels and another 40% of nights in paid campsites.

Shane Little

The Cost: About $40 U.S. per person, per day. (Shane has more tips and info on costs in South Africa on his blog).

This included bits and bobs I still needed to buy in Cape Town (not a lot), one day in the bus, two new inner tubes and lots of food and beer. I’m hopeful that the amount of hotels versus camping will lean more to the camping side as the trip carries on, allowing me to lower my budget.

Tips: “I saved a lot of time in internet cafes by using my mobile with a local SIM card. The cost of internet data was dirt cheap so could use it to check social media networks and answer emails. I only went to internet cafes for blog updates and longer emails.”

***

Can You Help?
Keeping these sections up-to-date and adding new sections relies on the community. That’s you!

If you’ve recently been on tour and can tell us about your daily budget, please Get In Touch and share your answers to these 3 basic questions:

1. What did you spend per person, per day on average? This is for daily expenses like food, hotels, public transport within a country but not exceptional extras like bike repair, flights to/from the country.

2. Can you briefly describe your style of travel? Are you ultra low budget (e.g. a devoted wild camper, cook all your own food) or more medium budget (e.g. will occasionally splash out on a hotel, meal in restaurant)?

3. Any tips you want to share related to costs in this region? Was something particularly cheap or expensive? How would you recommend others save money?

We’ll add your answers to the relevant page, along with a photo of you on tour and a link to your bike touring blog (if you have one). Thanks!

The Cost Of Bike Touring: Britain & Europe

Posted February 1st, 2012

How much will an independent bike tour cost? 

Britain and Europe are relatively expensive places to tour but even so, it’s possible to get by on a relatively tight budget if you’re willing to camp and cook all your own food. Around €15 euros per person, per day would be a rock-bottom budget (maybe a bit less in southern or eastern Europe, where prices are broadly cheaper). If you want to enjoy the cafés and see a few attractions, plan on spending double that.

Scroll down to see who we talked to and what they said.

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Hans van der Veeke lives in the Netherlands and has bike toured in Finland (2009), Italy  (2010) and Ireland (2011).

Hans van der Veeke

We do not have a budget but we like to travel as cheaply as possible. We also do enjoy some luxuries. For example, I ‘need’ my shower after a day of cycling. Whenever possible we do the cooking ourselves but sometimes I like a ‘decent’ meal consisting of a piece of well prepared meat or fish.

The Cost: Anywhere from €15-30 per person, per day.

Finland – “The campsites were on average € 17 for two people. We usually prepared our meals with groceries bought before arriving on the campsite. This was on average €10 so our total was around €30 for two people, per day. In Finland it is very easy to camp cheaply because you are allowed to camp (almost) anywhere. The ‘uumarantas’ (swimming places) are perfect spots. There is usually a toilet and potable water there. Also many villages have an ‘all you can eat’ restaurant. For €10-15 you can get a hot meal and a filled belly. We did not always like the food.”

Italy – “In 2010 we cycled from Italy to our home in the north of Holland. Camping prices can be found here. We cooked our own meals but everything was a bit more expensive so we averaged €40 a day for two people. The problem was that it was warmer and that the availability of terraces in the sun that serve beer were plenty. Do the math :)”

Ireland – “Ireland was quite expensive, around €60 each day for the two of us. Due to the bad weather and absence of campsites we had to find other places to sleep. Whenever possible we took a hostel. This was usually between €40-50 for a private room. B&Bs were expensive (€60-70) and campsites averaged €22. One thing we found out is that every village has a take-away Chinese restaurant. For €10 we got a meal which was sufficient for us. The cost of our accomodation can be found here.”

Tips: “My tip for cutting costs is preparing the coffee, tea and soup along the way using a portable stove. I use the JetBoil which will make two cups of hot drink in two minutes in the most scenic places. The cost of that is only  €0.25 compared to €5 when ordering coffee at a restaurant.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Graeme Wilgress. Cycled 4,000 miles around the UK coast in 2011.

Graeme Wilgress

The Cost: Around $30-50 U.S. a day (£20-30). “This was a medium-budget trip. I wild camped a few times but found myself drawn to campgrounds for the company that I knew I’d find and because I could shower, clean and dry my clothes. This is important in a predominantly damp climate like the UK. I also allowed myself ‘treats’ in the form of meals out with a beer sometimes, usually when I was resting or after a really tough or significant day. The rest of the time I cooked my own food from ingredients.”

Biggest Expense – “Food accounted for around half of my budget. Meals out weren’t more expensive than cooking when you take into account the additional cost of the gas I was using (£4-5 per cylinder) but add in a couple of drinks and it’s way more expensive. I should have taken my petrol stove! Since it was rarely warm enough to sit outside, cold food didn’t work well for me. I ate lots of rice and pasta but the cost was down to volume of food needed rather than expensive ingredients. I could have saved lots by not going in cafés and eating processed meals. It wouldn’t have helped my moral though, which is why I allowed myself quality food and coffee. Food was my daily reward, so if I wanted a steak I’d cook one!”

Tips: “Drinking tea will save around 50% of the cost of coffee. You get several cups and most cafes will fill the pot again if you wish. In Yorkshire they give you about 2 litres anyway!”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Friedel & Andrew. Live in the Netherlands, and have done numerous short trips there in 2011. Cycled in Spain and Denmark in 2010 / 2011. “Our style of travel varies between low and medium budget. We love to wild camp and cook our own food but don’t hesitate to take a hotel room or enjoy a meal out if we feel like it.”

Cycling just outside of Marmelojo

The Cost: About $40-50 U.S. a day, on average as a couple. “This can go as high as $130-150 U.S. a day if we take a simple hotel but on average the cost is far lower. When we’re cycling around the Netherlands, we try to make use of wild camping sites (free) or simple campgrounds where the cost is around $15 U.S. (€10-12 euros) a night. Our favourite treat is a cup of coffee and a slice of apple pie, which costs about $5 U.S. per person. The further south you go in Europe, the cheaper prices become. In Spain, for example, eating out is around half the cost of the Netherlands and you can easily find a simple hotel room for around $50-60 U.S. but in the Netherlands you’re looking at closer to $100 U.S. for a double room.”

Tips: “Bring a stove and be prepared to wild camp where possible. There are many beautiful forests and rural places where you can pitch your tent. These two things will lower your costs significantly and free up cash to see some of the museums and historic sites that Europe is famous for.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Lars Erik Sira. Lives in Norway and has done several bike tours there.

Lars cycling in Norway

The Cost: Around €30 a day for a one-month trip in 2011 (spent roughly €1000 for the month), on a low to medium budget.  “I like sleeping in a tent and making my own food, although a soft bed and restaurant food is occasionally very nice. For this tip, about half of the cost was food, including 10-12 meals at restaurants. I camped for two out of every three nights and spent the rest in hotels, cabins and at homes of local people (Couchsurfing). The costs of overnight stays summed up to a little less than €400. ”

“Most foreigners will regard Norway as a high cost country. Dinner in the cheapest restuarants starts at €12-15 and an aditional €7-10 for a beer or a glas og wine, pitching a tent at a camp site is from €12 and upwards and it’s hard to find a cabin for less than €30. A cup of coffee is €2-5.”

Tips: “It is possible to cycle in Norway without spending a fortune. You are allowed to put up your tent nearly everywhere, according to the Outdoor Recreation Act. And if you mainly cook your own food on a stove you’ll get by with buying groceries. Fishing opportunities are by the way excellent along the coast, and free!”

***

Can You Help?
Keeping these sections up-to-date and adding new sections relies on the community. That’s you!

If you’ve recently been on tour and can tell us about your daily budget, please Get In Touch and share your answers to these 3 basic questions:

1. What did you spend per person, per day on average? This is for daily expenses like food, hotels, public transport within a country but not exceptional extras like bike repair, flights to/from the country.

2. Can you briefly describe your style of travel? Are you ultra low budget (e.g. a devoted wild camper, cook all your own food) or more medium budget (e.g. will occasionally splash out on a hotel, meal in restaurant)?

3. Any tips you want to share related to costs in this region? Was something particularly cheap or expensive? How would you recommend others save money?

We’ll add your answers to the relevant page, along with a photo of you on tour and a link to your bike touring blog (if you have one). Thanks!

The Cost Of Bike Touring: South America

Posted February 1st, 2012

How much will an independent bike tour cost?

In South America, it really depends on where you’re going. Brazil is relatively expensive. Bolivia is far cheaper.

Scroll down to read about bike tourists who’ve recently been there, and their experiences.

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The Cyclist & The Trip: Paddy & Laura cycled 15,000 miles around South America in 2011 and 2012. They are picky when it comes to stealth camping and don’t like to set their tent up near roads, so they often sleep in hotels or hostels.

Paddy & Laura

The Cost: Anywhere from $15-25 U.S. per person, per day or $1,000-1,400 U.S. a month.

What we actually spend varies drastically depending on where we are in South America. Brazil was very expensive whilst Bolivia was significantly cheaper. In terms of food, we don’t eat in restaurants that often as we have a stove where we cook can something cheap and healthy ourselves. This was essential in Argentina and Brazil, where eating out was expensive, but since Bolivia we’ve found that roadside restaurants do a really cheap lunch which is cheaper than making something ourselves.

Tips: “Staying with Couchsurfing and WarmShowers hosts in big cities has saved money on accommodation, but more than that it has been a great way to meet local people and learn more about the places we have visited.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Harriet & Neil spent 19 months cycling around South America from September 2009 to March 2011. They love remote routes and enjoy wild camping but always reward themselves with a bed and some tasty treats when they reach a town.

Neil and Harriet

The Cost: They spent $8-10 U.S. per person, per day in Bolivia and Peru. In Argentina and Chile, the cost was $17-20 U.S. per day. Brazil was the most expensive at $27 U.S. per day.

In Bolivia and Peru, accommodation was cheap. We camped only a third of the time and ate set meals in restaurants. In Argentina and Chile we camped two out of every three nights and rarely ate out. Chile is more expensive than Argentina but we treated ourselves to fewer luxuries there to keep costs down. In Brazil, it was hard to find wild campsites and we often had to resort to staying in hotels and eating out in restaurants.

Tips: They have lots of tips!

Bolivia & Peru – “Set meals are a great deal generally costing about $2 U.S. for 2 courses which is often less than you can cook a meal for just look out for ‘Almuerzo’ (lunch) or ‘Cena’ (dinner) signs.”

Argentina – “We think facturas (pastries) at Argentine bakeries are excellent value. A dozen only cost about $3 U.S. and they’ll help you from getting too skinny.”

Chile – “Internet cafes are quite expensive but there is free internet at all public libraries and even if a town looks very run down it probably has a library.”

Brazil – “You can often get a free shower at Petrobras petrol stations.”

***

Can You Help?
Keeping these sections up-to-date and adding new sections relies on the community. That’s you!

If you’ve recently been on tour and can tell us about your daily budget, please Get In Touch and share your answers to these 3 basic questions:

1. What did you spend per person, per day on average? This is for daily expenses like food, hotels, public transport within a country but not exceptional extras like bike repair, flights to/from the country.

2. Can you briefly describe your style of travel? Are you ultra low budget (e.g. a devoted wild camper, cook all your own food) or more medium budget (e.g. will occasionally splash out on a hotel, meal in restaurant)?

3. Any tips you want to share related to costs in this region? Was something particularly cheap or expensive? How would you recommend others save money?

We’ll add your answers to the relevant page, along with a photo of you on tour and a link to your bike touring blog (if you have one). Thanks!

The Cost Of Bike Touring: China & Southeast Asia

Posted February 1st, 2012

How much will an independent bike tour cost? 

In China and Southeast Asia, prices are cheap, according to our survey of bike tourists. It’s possible to spend as little as $10-15 U.S. per person, per day for routine costs such as food and accommodation, including a comfortable hotel room.

Much depends, of course, on your style of travel. Will you go for a bed in a dorm or a double room in a good hotel? Will you eat with the locals or splurge on a nice Western meal with a glass of wine?

Scroll down to see who we talked to and what they said.

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The Cyclist & The Trip: Emma & Justin spent several months cycling around Southeast Asia in late 2011 and early 2012. Most of their time was in Laos and Cambodia, with a few weeks in Vietnam and Thailand.

Emma & Justin


The Cost:
Around $15 U.S. per person, per day. Accommodation usually cost between $8-15 U.S. per room and cheaper meals were $2-3 U.S. each.

Outside Southeast Asia we were budget travellers, camping around 85 percent of the time and cooking our own meals at least once a day. In Southeast Asia, that same daily budget stretched further allowing us to stay in guesthouses almost every night and eat almost all of our meals out.

Tips: “If you want to schedule in some hammock time we thought Don Det in Southern Laos was very good value compared to the prices we were quoted to stay at islands off the coast in Cambodia and Thailand, with private bungalows available for $5-8 U.S. On the eating front, market stalls are usually much cheaper than restaurants, but you might need to eat before dusk as we often found stalls shutting up early.”

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The Cyclist & The Trip: Eleanor Moseman. Cycled over 10,000 miles around China, Taiwan, and Tibet – mostly solo – in 2011 and 2012.

Eleanor Moseman


The Cost:
Around $15 U.S. a day for a solo cyclist or $20 U.S. a day for a couple.

If you know the language and the weather is good, it could be a lot less. In July, I spent only $150 U.S. but I did a lot of camping and living with locals.

Tips: “Men can get around for $10 U.S. a day because they are allowed to stay in truck stops with the locals but women have to budget more.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Álvaro and Alicia. Cycled Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and China in 2011. They are ‘medium-budget’ travellers who spent around $28 U.S. (€22) per day total as a couple, on bike tour through North America, South America, Asia and Europe. “We love to wild camp but we don’t hesitate to sleep in a hotel if we can’t find a nice camping spot for the night.”

Alvaro y Alicia

 

The Cost: Around $13-20 U.S. a day.

Thailand is more expensive than Laos. Vietnam is between them. China can be as cheap as Laos or as expensive as you want.

On Accommodation- “In China we would pay $4-5 U.S. per person for a room. Camping is quite easy if you go to the Tibetan area since the population is low and there are a lot of nice lonely spots but not so easy in the densely populated areas near the big cities. In Laos, camping wasn’t easy since every flat space near the road was used by a rice field or a house. In Thailand, we went to the Wats (temples) and asked to sleep there. They always grant you a nice safe place for you and the bike and they feed you. We called it wat-surfing. We also sometimes set our mosquito nets in platforms in the rice fields, which are used for drying rice. This is quite convenient but it can be hard to find one in good shape.

On Food – “It’s cheap and tasty all over the region, so most of the time we would buy take-aways for dinner. We normally had local soup for breakfast and rice or noodles during the day. We tried to cook the noodles ourselves a couple of times but the result was disgusting, so in the end we just bought extra rice when we had had lunch and added fried veggies for dinner. We spent about $2-3 U.S. for breakfast, $4-5 U.S. for lunch between the two of us and $3-4 to buy stuff for the day (bananas, cookies and all sorts of tasty things).”

Tips: “Learning how to haggle always comes in handy. Also, some sentences in the local language can take you a long way, especially: “how much does it cost” and “it’s too expensive”. Always ask the price of the meals before you order them! The street food is really great everywhere, and really cheap.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Line & Maarten. Cycled 3 months in China in late 2011 before crossing into Southeast Asia, as part of a world trip. They are medium-budget travellers who sometimes take nicer hotel rooms and treat themselves to a Western meal with a good glass of wine.

Line & Marten

The Cost: As a couple, they spent around $30 U.S. a day in China and about $20 U.S. a day in Vietnam and Laos.

China – “We spent about $15 U.S. (100 Yuan) for a double room most nights. The standard is quite high: ensuite bathroom, kettle, clean sheets, towels and often a TV and air conditioning. For food, we had a hard time finding breakfast to suit us so often we spent a lot on cake, about $4 U.S. (25 yuan). This is clearly a luxury and not the cheapest breakfast you can find. At lunch and dinner, we mostly paid around 25 yuan for two people.  If you want to go cheaper, instant noodles are available everywhere for just 3.5 Yuan a portion but freshly made food is so much better and costs only a little more!”

Finding a cheaper hotel is not very easy. They are not easy to recognise for people who cannot read Chinese. In bigger cities, youth hostels with dorm beds start from about $5 U.S. (35 Yuan).

Vietnam – “Accommodation in Vietnam is a bit cheaper than in China. Most nights we paid $7-10 U.S. (150,000 – 200.000 Dong) for a double room. The standard isn’t as high as in China but often the better rooms have free wifi internet. For food, we spent $1-2 U.S. on breakfast (20.000 – 30.000 Dong) for bread, jam, Nutella, cheese and fresh fruits. Lunch and dinner will set you back around $2.5-3.5 U.S. (50.000 to 70.000 Dong).”

Pho soup is the cheapest option. You can double the prices if you go for Western food: steak with a glass of wine instead of fried rice with a Tiger beer.

Laos – “Accommodation is often simpler and cheaper than in Vietnam: between $5 U.S. (40,000 Kip) for a fan room with ensuite bathroom and $15 U.S. (120,000 Kip) for a room with air-conditioning and TV in a touristy place like Luang Prabang. For breakfast, we buy bread if possible. About $1 U.S. (10,000 Kip) gets us going in the morning; double that if we buy noodle soup or sticky rice with an omelet. Lunch is often cheap: noodle soup for about $2 U.S. (20,000 Kip) for the two of us. Dinner can be just as cheap but more often we pay around $6 U.S. (50,000 Kip). Spending around $20 U.S. on a very nice dinner with a glass of wine is also possible in Luang Prabang or Vientiane.”

Tips: “Eating in a simple place on the road is often very cheap and the food is almost always great. Especially in China! Also, travel in pairs. That is the biggest money saver! In Southeast Asia, there is no price difference between a single or double hotel room.”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Rik & Paula Bradshaw. Cycled two months in Thailand, at the end of 2011. Focused on nicer rooms and good food, so paid a bit more than the average bike tourist.

Rik & Paula


The Cost: 
Around $20 U.S. a day for a solo cyclist or $35 U.S. a day for a couple.

We definitely didn’t travel on a shoestring! We met people bartering down prices but we thought prices were reasonable enough and the standard was great.

Guesthouses – “We stayed in a mix of guesthouses and hotels. At the lower end, we landed a clean room with private bathroom and air con for $10 U.S. (300 Baht) up to the beautiful resort at Khlong Yai at the end of our trip for $30 U.S. (900 Baht). We had the place to ourselves including the delicious pool. On average, we paid about $15 U.S. (450 Baht) per night.”

Food & Drinks – “We ate at a mix of street stalls, restaurants and sometimes in Western-style cafés to satisfy those cravings for egg and bacon breakfasts. We also splurged once on the most amazing soft shell crab. In short, we didn’t hold back when it came to meals. We spent about $10 U.S. per person, per day (375 Baht) on food.”

Tips: “We’d often grab BBQ pork skewers and sticky rice at a street stall for breakfast – only $1 U.S. (30 Baht) per person!”

***

The Cyclist & The Trip: Paul & Grace cycled in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and China in 2011 and 2012.

Grace & Paul


The Cost:
Around $33 U.S. per day, as a couple.

In these countries it’s quite easy to achieve that. Like most westerners cycling in this region, we eat street food since it’s so good and cheap.

Tips: They recommend hotels over camping, for a number of reasons:

  • Heat and Humidity.  - “In Thailand, Cambodia and at lower elevations in Laos and China it never really cools down at night and stays humid.  Even after cycling months in this region we still find it difficult to sleep well without air conditioning.  Plus it’s a wonderful feeling after a hot day of cycling to lie down in an air-conditioned room.  Pure bliss!”
  • Showers.  “At the end of each day we are covered in sweat so our evening showers let us feel ‘human’ again.”
  • Landmines.  “Unfortunately Cambodia and Laos are covered in them.  It’s not safe to just go put up your tent behind the trees.”
  • Hills. “Laos and Yunnan China have some very steep ones, so the less weight /baggage we carry – the easier it is for us to cycle over them.”

***

Can You Help?
Keeping these sections up-to-date and adding new sections relies on the community. That’s you!

If you’ve recently been on tour and can tell us about your daily budget, please Get In Touch and share your answers to these 3 basic questions:

1. What did you spend per person, per day on average? This is for daily expenses like food, hotels, public transport within a country but not exceptional extras like bike repair, flights to/from the country.

2. Can you briefly describe your style of travel? Are you ultra low budget (e.g. a devoted wild camper, cook all your own food) or more medium budget (e.g. will occasionally splash out on a hotel, meal in restaurant)?

3. Any tips you want to share related to costs in this region? Was something particularly cheap or expensive? How would you recommend others save money?

We’ll add your answers to the relevant page, along with a photo of you on tour and a link to your bike touring blog (if you have one). Thanks!

What Does Bike Touring Cost

Posted January 31st, 2012

Wondering how much your bike tour will cost?

We’ve surveyed bike tourists around the world, to see what they’re spending on tour. Click on the region where you’re planning to travel.

If you’d like to add your experience, please get in touch. We’re always looking for the latest info on what people are spending.

The Cost Of Bike Touring: China & Southeast Asia

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/china-southeast-asia

How much will an independent bike tour cost? In China and Southeast Asia, prices are cheap. Around $15-20 U.S. per day should be more than adequate for routine costs such as food from restaurants and a decent hotel room. You can get away with less if you're a devoted wild camper or know the local language. read more...

The Cost Of Bike Touring: South America

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/southamerica

In South America, the cost of your bike tour will likely vary wildly, depending on where you're going. Brazil is relatively expensive. Bolivia is far cheaper. Cooking your own food is essential to keep costs low in the more expensive countries. read more...



The Cost Of Bike Touring: Britain & Europe

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/britain-europe

Britain and Europe are relatively expensive places to tour but even so it's possible to get by on about €15 per person, per day if you're willing to camp and cook your own food. You might even spend a bit less in southern or eastern Europe, where prices are cheaper. To enjoy the cafés and see a few attractions, plan on doubling that figure. read more...


The Cost Of Bike Touring: Africa

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/africa

Africa isn't necessarily the cheapest place in the world to cycle. Some countries can be surprisingly expensive. read more...



The Cost Of Bike Touring: North America

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/north-america

You can spend as much or as little as you like in North America. There are plenty of hotels and restaurants that will be happy to cater for you but equally there's plenty of open land and supermarkets for those on a low budget. read more...


The Cost Of Bike Touring: Australia & New Zealand

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/australia-newzealand

In Australia and New Zealand, as with many developed countries, it's easy to spend as much as you want but there are also plenty of ways to stick to a budget. read more...



The Cost Of Bike Touring: India

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/india

In India, prices are cheap but you'll have to bargain for the best rates. As long as you barter, $5-10 U.S. a day should be enough for a low budget tour. read more...


The Cost Of Bike Touring: Extended Trips

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/budget/extended-trips

How much will an independent bike tour cost? Here are some typical expenses and budgets from bike tourists who've undertaken an extended trip across multiple countries and continents. read more...



We also have general articles about budgeting and saving money for a two-wheeled adventure. You probably need less than you think – certainly less than backpacking or driving around the world!

Saving The Tax: More Bike Touring Gear For Your Money

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/save-vat-bike-touring-gear

Planning a bike tour in Europe? Hold off on buying a bike and all the gear until you get here. You could save hundreds of dollars by claiming back the sales tax, for a savings of up to 25% on all your bicycle touring equipment. read more...

How Much Does Bike Touring Cost? We do the math.

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/the-cost-of-bike-touring

What does it cost to go bike touring? A mere $23 U.S. a day, if our record of expenses is anything to go by. A bargain! Check out how much we spent in total on our world bicycle tour, broken down by category and country. read more...



Bike Tour More, Spend Less

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/bike-tour-more-spend-less

We recently discovered that it cost us just $23 U.S. a day to travel the world on our bicycles. That’s a cheap price for the adventure of a lifetime but looking back on our trip, we could have done it for even less. Why bother? Alistair Humphreys says it well: “You have a choice – read more...


Saving Money For Your Dream Adventure

http://travellingtwo.com/resources/saving-for-your-dream-trip

The secret to saving for your great bicycle getaway is surprisingly simple: live beneath your means. Here are 10 of our best tips for doing just that. Before you know it, your bank balance will be brimming with money for your bicycle tour, or whatever other dream you have. read more...