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Mavic XM719 Rims: Probably Not Suitable For Loaded Touring

Posted December 8th, 2013

When choosing a rim for the next wheel on your touring bike, you may want to avoid Mavic’s XM719 model.

We’ve recommended this rim in the past (based on our own experience and the recommendations of others) but it seems something has changed. In the past month, several bike tourists have contacted us to report broken XM719 rims.

Bert and Gillian were the first to get in touch. They’ve broken five of these rims in just 9,000km of cycling around North America. In an email, they wrote:

It started happening after only 1,000km on the back wheel of the bike with the heaviest load. By the time we completed 3,000km a further two back-wheel rims broke on the same bike. At that stage we replaced the back rim on the heavier bike with a SunRingle Rhyno Lite rim, which solved the problem. During the last week, the same issue developed on the front wheel on the bike with the heaviest load (after 9,000km) as well as the back wheel of the bike with the lesser load (after 6,000km).

Bert & Gillian’s touring bikes.

Francesco Alaimo also told us that a crack developed in his XM719 rim after just 1,000km. He was able to ride the bike a further 3,000km before the rim gave out entirely.

In Bishkek I met a guy who had to substitute his XM719 for exactly the same problem after less than 5,000km and a couple on a tandem had exactly the same problem previously.

Cracked XM719 rimFrancesco’s cracked XM719 rim.

When we asked for opinions about rims on Facebook, Charles Coderre also reported failures of the XM719 rim (although his rims did last quite a bit longer than for the other cyclists we heard from).

We are riding fully loaded (bike and gear = 80 to 100 pounds). The Mavic XM719 we had on our rear wheels did not last. After 8,000 kilometers, my rim cracked on the entire circumference and was starting to open. I changed for Sun Rhyno Lite. After 13,000 kilometers my wife’s rear MavicXM719 rim was also starting to crack and open.

To double-check these reports, we asked two bike experts for their opinion. Both Marten Gerritsen and the wheel builders at Bike4Travel recommend Ryde Sputnik rims as a durable choice, and both had concerns about the suitability of Mavic rims for loaded touring.

We put these concerns to Mavic and they said the XM719 was a reliable rim with a return rate of less than 0.5%.

We’ve been selling those kind of rims to globe trotters for decades now (so thousands of them) and with very few issues. That said, this type of use (heavy load on the bike and rider) makes the rim more prone to this kind of fatigue. We have no influence on the wheel assembly and very often those kinds of cracks happen if the spoke tension is too high.

Mavic will replace a rim under warranty (if it’s found to be defective) but that’s of little use to most bike tourists. When your rim breaks during a tour, you just need to get it repaired and keep moving. The last thing you want is to be stuck in one place for days (or possibly weeks) negotiating a replacement with a company — especially when that company makes contact so difficult!

On the Mavic website, there are no obvious contact details (only lists of shops selling their products). It took us several days to get any reply via their social media channels. Compare that to our experience, when a Bontrager rim failed on us after just 3,000km of loaded touring. We were able to contact them easily and had a no-questions-asked refund within days (our previous rims from Alex and Alessa lasted for nearly 30,000km before we opted to replace them).

Given all of this, we can’t recommend the XM719 rim for touring anymore. It’s true that any one of these failures could have been caused by something other than the rim (eg. over-inflation of the tire or a poorly-built wheel) but when we hear so many reports about a single rim, it naturally makes us cautious. To be on the safe side, go for an option such as the Ryde Sputnik. Hopefully that will save you the trouble caused by a rim failure on the road!

Loading Up A Brompton Bike For Touring

Posted November 1st, 2013

We recently received an email from Peter, who wanted to tell us about his 3 week trip around Europe on a Brompton folding bike.

Peter especially wanted to share his touring set up on the Brompton. He pointed out that it’s possible to carry a lot of luggage on this little bike, with no modifications.

Brompton Folding BikePhoto by Peter Provaznik

I carried around 40 pounds (20kg) on it: half of that was in my waterproof front bag (including heavy camera gear) and the other 20 pounds was on my rear carrier (tent, sleeping bag, Exped Synmat) in a drybag. It travelled very well!

The front bag on Peter’s bike is sitting in a standard Brompton folding basket and the dry bag on the back is held tight with straps.

This touring setup may not be for everyone, but it’s great if you want to combine bike riding with public transport. It gives you all the freedom of bike touring and all the flexibility of being able to easily hop on a train, bus or boat if you want to skip ahead a few kilometers.

As Peter’s experience shows, you can even take your bike to the dining car of the train for a nice meal!

brompton in train dining carPhoto by Peter Provaznik

WeeHoo Bike Trailer For Kids

Posted June 15th, 2013

Last weekend we were out cycling when we spotted something different on the bike path: a recumbent-style trailer for kids.

We weren’t quick enough to get a photo of it but later we searched online and discovered that we’d seen the WeeHoo trailer.

WeeHoo trailer
Weehoo trailer in use. Photo by SheBicycles on flickr

We’re still getting a lot of use out of our Chariot Cougar 1 trailer but the WeeHoo is an intriguing solution as Luke grows up. In another year or so (when he’s 2+ years old), we think he’d love this. We like the look of it better than a standard tag-along bike because it would allow him to relax (read, sleep, play) while riding.

It’s also reasonably affordable: $298.93 from REI.

From what we’ve read so far, the trailer gets fairly positive reviews online. We’ve seen comments such as:

I cannot stress enough how much my kid loves this thing. Between the harness and the pedal straps I’m not worried about her at all. We whip through curvy sidewalk approaches, ride over and off of curbs, hit potholes, have managed to hit 28 mph… all without the first sign of problems.

My daughter is strapped in with a nice, comfortable harness in a cushy seat. Her weight is down low where it doesn’t affect the feel of my bike. The hitch is completely different from other trailers. It uses your seat post as an axle which eliminates almost all loose play. It comes with bags which, while not as quality as nice panniers, are great for putting your kid’s stuff in. Not only can your kid snack while peddling, the Weehoo comes with a cup holder and pocket for snacks that your kid can reach. My daughter can take a little snooze after a long day.

The main downfall of the WeeHoo seems to be its weight: it’s a hefty 15kg or 35 pounds. Tackling the Alps with this trailer might be out of the question but it but it should be fine for touring around the flatter parts of the world. On the other hand, some people don’t seem to take any notice of the weight!

And, for families with more than one kid, WeeHoo’s Facebook page suggests that a new double trailer will be hitting the market soon.

WeeHoo Double Trailer

Do you have any experience with the WeeHoo trailer? Leave a comment.

Touring With Technology: Smartphones & Dynamo Hubs

Posted April 20th, 2013

Of all the emails that land in our mailbox, a good proportion are about touring with technology.

We’ve shared some of our experiences with dynamo hubs and finding power sources on the road, but it’s always nice to get a fresh point of view, so we were very happy to learn that the latest issue of CTC magazine has an article about this very topic.

Touring With Technology

The article is written by Steve Rock. He cycled coast-to-coast across France, using a smartphone, charger and various apps to navigate. The article talks about his experiences with Memory Map software, the Viewranger GPS navigation app, a SON dynamo hub and various accessories from PedalPower.

Read the article here.

Posted in Equipment

Where Baby Sleeps When We’re Bike Touring

Posted December 13th, 2012

When we began camping and bike touring with our son he was just a few months old. One of our biggest concerns was finding a way for him to sleep safely and comfortably.

Baby Asleep In The Tent

Most advice online was targeted to people travelling by car. Hauling a large and relatively heavy travel cot around by bicycle was not an option.

Since we co-sleep at home anyway, we didn’t actually feel the need for a travel cot. If we had, we probably would have gone for something like this Samsonite Pop-Up Travel Cot. Someone gave us one of these and we were impressed by how lightweight and compact it is.

Samsonite Cot

For overnight camping you’d have to add an insulating layer (the ‘mattress’ that comes with it is pretty thin) but otherwise it seems quite handy for a very young baby that can’t roll over. Older babies will not be safe in this cot as they can easily tip it over.

We never used the Samsonite cot. Instead, we started with a Z-lite mattress, folded up to suit Luke’s proportions. We put it between our two camping mats, and it turned out to be pretty good for changing diapers as well as sleeping.

Sleeping Arrangements

At night, we covered the mattress with a soft blanket. Luke was dressed in PJs, a down sleep sack and a hat. We had another blanket that went over top of him as well. Since temperatures were close to freezing at night, we added a hot water bottle for good measure. As you can see, Luke was a pretty happy camper.

Camping With A Baby

When Luke was 5 months old, we decided to ride our bikes to France. This was a 2-week journey and we wanted a more compact sleeping mat than the Thermarest Z-lite mattress. We invested in the short version of the Thermarest NeoAir. The NeoAir is wonderfully light (just 230g) and we hope Luke can use it for camping until he’s 4-5 years old.

Thermarest Neo Air

By this point, Luke had made it clear that he didn’t like sleepsacks so instead we invested in a sleeping bag that would cover both mum and Luke at the same time: the Vaude Sioux 500 XL.

Vaude Sioux 500 XL

This set-up worked really well for us, and we’ll use it again next summer.

Now that we’re off to Cuba, we’re planning to do exactly what we do at home: co-sleep. Obviously not every family will be comfortable with this but for us it’s the most pleasant and practical arrangement.

Want to know more about bike touring with a baby? Here’s a video of our summer bike tour to France:

And one made by our friend Blanche, which tells more about our set-up.