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Getting Visas For Different Countries On A Bike Tour


“Remember that part in The Wizard of Oz, when Dorothy arrives in Emerald City?
She knocks on the door, giddy with excitement, and asks to be let inside.
Remember what the moustached guard says? ‘Ain’t no way, ain’t no how!’
Applying for visas is kind of like that.
” – Mike On A Bike

Visas are a necessary evil. You can’t go too far from home without needing at least a few of these official documents in your passport, but getting visas can be stupidly complicated.

Cambodian Visa

In general, the only rule about applying for visas is that there are no rules. How easy or hard it is to get your visa depends on:

  • Your nationality
  • The political situation at the time
  • Whether you want to pay for a rush service (if there is one)
  • The general whims of the officials working behind the counter

Sometimes it’s an easy, straight-forward procedure that is completed within a day or even at the airport.

Other times you have to elbow your way through a queue, make repeated runs to the bank and pretend not to be annoyed when the bureaucrat in charge tells you he’s not opening the office today, because there was a big party the night before and he’d rather sleep (yes, this happened to us). Usually you can apply for them on the road but occasionally you have to apply from your home country.

A further complication is that the rules are always changing, and usually visas need to be used a few weeks or months after they’re issued.

That means you can’t apply for them too far in advance and there’s no point in obsessing about where you’ll get every last visa before you leave on an extended trip. What is possible when you set out from home may be impossible by the time you get closer. Sometimes wars and diplomatic squabbles will spoil your party. Other times you’ll find old enemies making peace with one another, paving the way for a route you never considered before.

Just a few passport photos
Just a few passport photos from a world bike trip.

What can you do to prepare? Getting a broad idea of the situation is always good.

  • Look up the official websites of the countries you want to visit and read current regulations.
  • Figure out if you can apply from somewhere en route, or if you’ll have to mail your passport home for processing.
  • See if there are agencies who will help with the procedure (this sometimes makes things faster and is a necessity for countries like Iran).
  • Research the best places to log your application. Some embassies are friendlier or more efficient than others. Updates are often reported on travel chat forums, such as Lonely Planet’s Thorntree boards.
  • Make sure you have all the required papers and passport photos ready or know how to get them: photocopies of bank statements, passport photocopies, a letter from your own embassy (you may have to pay), a Letter of Invitation (official letters often issued by tour companies for a fee) are all commonly requested for visas.

About 3-4 months before you’re ready to enter a country, start making real efforts to apply for your visa. Be realistic about how long this might take. Blocking off a few days or even weeks to pick up visas on an extended bike tour is not uncommon.

In addition to supplying all the things above, you may also be asked where you are staying in the country (pick the name of any hotel, it doesn’t matter, you just need to fill out the form) or for proof of onward travel. Mostly, if you explain you are cycling, the onward travel requirement fails to become an issue but some people do purchase a cheap, refundable plane ticket to satisfy the bureaucratic machine.

On the topic of onward travel, cyclist Doug Nienhuis says: “An easy fix is to book a flight online and print out an itinerary. You can do this without actually paying for the flight. Anyone looking closely can see that this itinerary is not a paid-for flight. However, it generally doesn’t matter. The important thing is to supply a document that can be attached to your application.”

Also, don’t forget to set aside extra cash for visas. Mostly the fees and associated costs are nominal but occasionally they can reach $100 U.S. or more per visa, not to mention the extra costs of hanging around a city for a few days while you wait for the visa to be processed.

Finally, have a Plan B. Sometimes, for whatever reason, that visa just doesn’t come through. Then it’s time to try something else. There are plenty of places in the world, so go explore one that’s easy to get in to!

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8 Responses to “Getting Visas For Different Countries On A Bike Tour”

  1. Hans says:

    Here http://www.vakantiefietser.nl/praktische-tips/wereldreis-voor-de-wereldfietser/ you can get a booklet which is updated every year, about all documents and other tips that you might need for your biketrip.
    Greetings, Hans

  2. Arpad says:

    The “booking a flight online and print out the itinary” for the visa request is a really great idea! ;) Thanks for it!

  3. Shane says:

    As usual you have simple but effective tips:)

    If in doubt, use photoshop!

    • Amaya says:

      I second Shane’s photoshop tip. Worked wonders for us when the Nigerians requested a letter of recommendation from our employers.

      • Doug W says:

        I’m confused. Why would you need Photoshop? To fake the signature or letterhead? Sounds like it could still be done in Word.

        But +1 on the tip for printing an unpaid-for plane ticket. Fantastic idea!

  4. Michiel says:

    As a Dutch citizen, I never had any problems applying for any visa. Not for Iran, Syria or Israel. In fact, the biggest hassle so far was getting a visa for the USA!

    Anyway, do your research, take your time and you will be fine.

  5. Rik says:

    When I saw the pic you’ve used for this post, I laughed out loud.
    We had heard that everybody gets ripped off when applying for a Cambodian visa at the border, so we thought we would be smart and go to the Cambodian Embassy is Thailand.
    Stupidly we didn’t take US dollars, only THB.
    The lady at the counter held up a sign saying $30 USD or 900THB – huh???
    We thought it was $20 each for a one month visa?
    She just shrugged, and started to walk away.
    So we paid the 900THB and got a 3 month visa – cool.
    Then I looked closer at the visa info in my passport – yep cost is $20USD. DOH!

  6. If you are stuck in turkey and are wondering about the new law. We wrote an article about it.

    http://www.tastingtravels.com/greek-afternoon-the-visa-travel/

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