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Topeak Mini 20 Pro Multitool Review


A few months ago, we went shopping for a new multitool.

After 4 years of constant use (daily commuting plus a 50,000km world bike trip), our old Topeak model was wearing out. We’ve used it to fix and adjust more things on our 2 bikes than we care to remember, and we’ve probably put it through the equivalent of at least 10 years of “normal” use.

Unsurprisingly a couple of the allen keys that we used most were completely stripped. These were the same allen keys needed to tighten and loosen the tool. Time for a new model.

After looking around at the various options, we settled on another Topeak multi-tool, the Mini Pro 20 (£ 22.49).

Here’s what we like about it:

  • Lightweight: It’s just 150g!
  • 20 tools: Some of the things included are a chain breaker, spoke wrenches, allen keys between 2-10mm, screw drivers, a T25 torx wrench (for disc brake bolts) and – for real emergencies – a bottle opener!
  • Durable: Despite being lightweight, this tool feels really solid. There are no plastic parts. The tools are made of hardened steel.

So far, we’ve used this multitool mostly for minor adjustments to the bike, like tightening a few screws and bolts. Andrew has also used it to install new cantilever brakes on his bicycle. We’ve found it easy to work with and, because it’s small, you can maneuver it without problem in small spaces.

We haven’t used the chain tool yet, but it looks like it will do the job.

To use the chain tool, you unscrew it from the rest of the multitool. This is a design feature we like quite a lot. It makes the chain tool easy to move around, for precise placement when you need to tighten a pin or break a link. There’s also a handy metal hook that helps hold the chain in place while you’re working on it.

A couple things are slightly odd about the Mini 20.

For one, the chain tool sits in the middle of the multitool, which means you can’t wrap your fingers through the middle of the multitool to unfold a particular tool. We wish there were a couple more tire levers as well. Usually you want 2-3 tire levers to fix a flat. With just one on the Mini 20, we still have to carry a set for flats.

Overall however, we’re pleased with our choice. When we consider the range of tools included, the 2-year warranty and carrying case, we think the Mini 20 multitool is pretty good value for money.

The real test will, of course, come during our next big bike tour. We’ll let you know how it goes.

This review is based on a free sample, provided by Topeak. We always give our honest opinion. If we don’t like something, we’ll tell you, and if our opinion changes after extensive use, we’ll tell you that too.

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19 Responses to “Topeak Mini 20 Pro Multitool Review”

  1. sz says:

    Try the chain tool before you set off on a long tour.

    I have the Mini18, which has a bit smaller chain tool than your Mini20 (and without the fold out handle of the newer Mini18+). I could never really use the chain tool, because I could not hold it firmly enough. Except when holding it with pliers ;) Brought the AlienII since, with two-piece body and quite a grip on the chain tool: me and my chains are happy.

  2. Stephen Almond says:

    4 years and allen keys completely stripped? And you bought another Topeak?

    I’ve had allen keys for 30 years which are still in fine condition (not part of a cycle tool, though). Is there some other factor to explain ‘soft’ cycle tools?

    • friedel says:

      Stephen, I guess the way we looked at it was that we probably gave those allen keys at least 10 years worth of “normal” use.

      Here’s how we figure it: few people bike more than 5,000km a year, and many people who do shorter trips may also do bike maintenance at home, where they use tools other than a multitool. We did 50,000km in 4 years. During that time, the Topeak tool was used almost exclusively to adjust and fix 2 bikes as well as some of our other gear so that’s 2-3 times the use that a single person would give the tool over the same distance.

      It was the allen keys that got the most use that were stripped (particularly, the ones that we used every time we needed the tool, to tighten and loosen it).

      Does that clarify a bit? I’ve added some of these details to the review, so thanks for asking the question.

      All that said, we were not experienced bike tourists when we started our world tour. The previous Topeak we bought was our first multitool, so it’s hard for me to compare with other models. I’d love to hear from other people how long their multitools have lasted, and under what kind of conditions / how much use?

      • Stephen Almond says:

        Friedel,

        Thanks for the reply and the explanation.
        I hope the tool works fine and that you continue to report on its performance.

        Steve

  3. friedel says:

    No worries Steve, always happy to clarify. We’ll definitely report back after we’ve put this one through a bit more testing, and if you have any thoughts on your multi-tool, please share. The more info out there, the better!

    • Stephen Almond says:

      I’m ashamed to say I don’t own a bike tool.
      I carry an assortment of allen keys, a chain tool, an adjustable spanner, tyre levers etc.
      My tool bag probably weighs the same as my bike frame…
      Hence, I’m interested in bike tool reviews such as your’s!

      Steve

  4. Ingrid says:

    I would have expected that the tool lasts much longer. It was made for the purpose for which you have used it. Topeak has really good stuff.

    • friedel says:

      Interesting. Maybe we set our expectations too low ;)

      I can’t remember what we paid for our old multitool now (at the time we weren’t blogging like we are now, and we didn’t note down all these details) but I expect it was about the same price. Let’s say $20-30 U.S.

      Dividing by the lifetime of 4 years for our old tool, I paid about $5-6 / year for a single tool that let me repair all our flat tires, change chains, adjust every screw and bolt on two bicycles, plus perform repairs to our stove and other gear.

      Is that so bad? Sounds pretty reasonable to me, but if anyone else has comparisons, please share!

  5. álvaro says:

    I have used right the opposite logic: I carry a bicycle multi-tool on my short rides and commutes, and a tool roll with an assortment of tools when I travel.

    Logic is that a multi-tool is handy enough to get you out of trouble, but not really good for any sort of maintenance or actual fixing. But I appreciate the lightweight in my back/saddle bag.

    If I have pannier bags I don’t mind the extra weight in exchange for proper tools. BTW, I don’t usually buy bicycle specific brands. Top quality from an ironmonger is cheaper and at least as good, if not better.

  6. Jessica says:

    Do you carry any other bike tools while you’re touring, or do the allen keys pretty much do the trick? Also, that’s very strange that they even bothered to only put one tire lever on the multi-tool– who can change a tire with just one?? Great review!

    • friedel says:

      Hi Jessica, yes, we carry heaps of other tools on a long tour. Cone wrenches, adjustable wrench, pliers…. on shorter trips though we’d just take the multi-tool.

  7. Ive got a Giant tool which seems to do almost everything I need, but I like a couple of extra allen keys, for those hard to reach places, and a spanner for the solid axles I run. I use the tool for all my bike maintainence at home as well, so I know I can do everything when I’m away.

    I’d love to know how well the chain tool works?

    • friedel says:

      We’ll let you know about the chain tool soon. We have to put new chains on before our tour to Spain, so that means sometime in the next 2 weeks or so.

      • Tyler says:

        Have you guys ever tried an SRAM chain? Or a masterlink? If not, I’d definitely recommend it. Throw the chain tools away and never look back!

  8. friedel says:

    I asked Topeak about their expected lifetime use and this was their reply:

    “There are many varying factors in the life of a multi-tool such as how often it is used and how forceful the tool is handled among other things. There is really no way for me to give you an exact time frame of how long the tool will last. There is a two year warranty with receipt for these tools. In many cases we have parts for years for purchase. Topeak does not have a “life expectency” for any products.”

  9. basket rider says:

    seems like a brilliant tool. Just bought a topeak hexus from cycleworld. all the same tols as the 20 but only a tenner

  10. Brimstone says:

    Gee no box wrenches….what if that nut holding that “diving board” strut holding the top of my front rack to my fork crown holding my front panniers holding my Teddy bear came loose half way across Namibia…I’d miss that Teddy bear…though I’m sure some Namibian kid would be happy….

  11. Karl says:

    I just bought one of these after seeing many favourable reviews on Wiggle. I hope it does the job as it wasn’t cheap! I already have a multi-tool at home, but it’s pretty basic doesn’t have a chain tool and weighs about the same as a full featured multi tool. I considered just taking a few appropriately sized allen keys, however a full size chain tool would weigh almost as much as the multitool.

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