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You Are Viewing Cycling Trips

A Free Guide To Cycling Across Australia’s Nullarbor

Posted October 16th, 2013

If you want to cross Australia on a bicycle, chances are you’ll find yourself riding across the Nullarbor plain. It’s a hot, long and dusty ride.

Nullarbor Desert
Push-biking it across the Nullarbor. Photo by Mike Boles.

To make things easier, download this set of notes. Our free guide was written by cyclist Mike Boles and laid out by us here at TravellingTwo HQ.

free guide to cycling the nullarbor

Inside the PDF, you’ll find Mike’s story of pedalling across the Nullarbor and day-by-day notes for the entire trip. He tells you where to find campgrounds, hotels, wild camping spots and − most importantly − water. Mike even gives tips for sightseeing along the way!

We hope you enjoy the notes. Download them. Share them. Let us know what you think.

If you have updates or further advice about cycling across the Nullarbor, please leave a comment below.

First Test of MacPac’s Prophet XPD Rain Jacket

Posted September 14th, 2013

MacPac Prophet XPDOver the summer, we were fortunate to pick up a couple rain jackets at an outlet sale. One of those was the MacPac Prophet XPD.

It’s made of eVent fabric and is actually aimed at mountain climbers. That said, we love it for cycling.

It’s waterproof of course, and has a ton of zipped pockets. The fabric is reassuringly thick and with a fleece or wool layer underneath, we’re confident that this jacket will be great in cold winter temperatures.

Perhaps our favourite feature is the hood. It’s made of a stiffened fabric that doesn’t budge an inch — even when biking straight into a head wind.

The eye-watering price tag is less pleasing. We shelled out just €100 at the outlet sale but the list price is closer to €500. Keep your eye out for clearance deals!

You might also have trouble getting ahold of it. We couldn’t find any shops that carry it online, aside from a few in New Zealand and Australia. We’ve asked MacPac for more details, and hopefully they’ll let us know if it’s available elsewhere, under another name perhaps?

Posted in Trip Equipment

Hilleberg Nallo 3GT Tent: A Brief Video Overview

Posted September 8th, 2013

We’ve been in Canada for the past 3 weeks, visiting family and doing a bit of camping along the way.

While there, we managed to shoot a short video of our beloved Hilleberg Nallo 3GT tent. As you can see, it’s pretty quick to set up (even when you have a ‘little helper’ to contend with) and it’s the perfect size for the three of us.

Read the full review of our tent.

Nine Tips For Cycling The Cabot Trail

Posted August 30th, 2013

The Cabot Trail in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia must be one of the most scenic bicycle rides in all of Canada, if not the world.

For a taste of the experiences that await you on this 300 kilometer road, set your mind on breathtaking sea vistas, framed by dramatic cliffs; curvy roads through timeless fishing villages; old-growth forests in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park and some truly epic climbs.

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On a recent trip around the Cabot Trail, we picked up a few tips that may be helpful to anyone planning to ride this classic route.

#1. Prepare For Wind

We camped for a week in mid-August and experienced stiff winds every day, blowing clockwise around the trail. It’s true that the views are better if you travel anti-clockwise (with the sea on your right) but on balance we would recommend going with the wind. This was also the choice of most cyclists we saw during our visit.

The strong winds also meant that our camp stove quickly burnt through fuel, even though we used firewood and stones to build a wind break around our stove. Keep your fuel bottles topped up, and preferably take a stove that uses either white gas or fuel from gas stations. We could not find gas canisters anywhere on the trail.

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Our stove surrounded by a make-shift windbreak.

#2. Pack Lightly

It almost goes without saying that when the hills are steep, it pays to travel as lightly as possible. We wouldn’t normally recommend dehydrated campers meals as they’re fairly expensive but it might be worth carrying a few on the Cabot Trail to save weight. Remember, sustained climbs at grades above 10% are common. Some grades even reach 15%. Ideally, you’ll get a bike with thin tires and a couple back bags. The exception is Meat Cove (see tip #7). In that case, you’ll want more robust tires for the dirt roads.

Rest Stop on French Mountain Climb

Rest stop on French Mountain. Photo by Bobcatnorth (flickr).

#3. Not All Campsites Have Water

There are campsites dotted regularly around the trail, including several in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Of the six main campsites in the national park, however, only those at Cheticamp, Broad Cove and Ingonish have water. The private campsites around the trail have all the services you’d expect (eg. wi-fi, water, showers). Expect to pay $25-30 Canadian a night for camping. Firewood and ice is usually available at campsites, for an extra charge.

#4. Reserve If You Plan To Stay In Hotels

Nearly every B&B, hotel and hostel we passed had a ‘no vacancy’ sign outside. If you don’t plan to bring a tent, you’d better reserve a room.

#5. There’s A Bike Shop In Cheticamp

We saw one good bike shop along the trail: Velo Max in Cheticamp. The owner does plenty of work preparing bikes for tour groups and should be able to help with any mechanical problems.

#6. Take Hiking Boots 

Most cyclists breeze around the Cabot Trail in 3-4 days but there are so many world-class hiking tracks on the Cabot Trail it almost seems criminal to pass them by. If you can, lengthen your stay by a few days and stop to explore on foot. You’ll see a side of Cape Breton that isn’t revealed until you walk away from the road. You could easily spend 10-14 days doing a mixture of cycling and hiking on the trail.

We do realize that hiking boots are a heavy addition to your panniers. If the weather isn’t too hot, you might consider using your boots both for cycling and walking. We personally find hiking boots very comfortable for both activities.

DSC_7396Ready to walk the trails of Cape Breton.

#7. Meat Cove Makes An Amazing Side Trip

The most northerly community in Cape Breton is Meat Cove. It’s literally perched on the edge of a cliff, overlooking a sheltered bay.

Meat Cove
Meat Cove view. Photo by Kaymoshusband (flickr).

Don’t kid yourself: this is a tough side trip. You’ll travel 30km off the Cabot Trail. The hills in the 15km leading up to Meat Cove are steep and relentless and the final 8km are on a rough dirt road. Still, your hard work will be rewarded by the stunning views and you can treat yourself to a bowl of chowder and a cold beer at the campground restaurant. There are also several hiking trails that lead up the hills and to hidden bays.

DSC_7323Chowder at Meat Cove

For an easier option, cycle the relatively easy (and entirely paved) 18km to the picturesque fishing community of Bay St. Lawrence. There you’ll find a campground, grocery store and delicious fish ‘n’ chips at the harbour.

#8. Be Aware of Bears And Coyotes

This is wild country, particularly in the national park. Bears and coyotes call the forests home, so if you are hiking or plan to wild camp, take appropriate precautions. Don’t eat near your tent or keep any food inside. More information is available on the national park website.

DSC_7397Lobster Supper with all the trimmings in Baddeck.

#9. Celebrate With An All-You-Can-Eat Lobster Supper

When you’ve completed the Cabot Trail, you deserve a treat! We very much enjoyed our meal at the Baddeck Lobster Suppers. With unlimited chowder, mussels, salads and desserts it’s the perfect place to fill up your hungry cyclist’s belly. If you don’t fancy lobster, they also roast salmon on a maple plank. Delicious!

These articles provide further tips and advice:

 

 

Four Years of Bike Touring Around The World

Posted July 27th, 2013

chrisroachA good friend of ours, Chris Roach, recently completed four years of bicycle touring around the world.

He put together a video (below) to share his adventures, experiences and motivations for doing such a long cycling trip. You can also read his last blog post from the trip.

What we especially enjoyed was the way that Chris shares the emotional as well as the physical side of the journey. Of his global bike tour, he wrote:

The physical side of the expedition had always only ever been only a shadow of the inner journey taking place over the last 4 years. The physical side has taken me to 3 continents and allowed me to marvel sitting at the base at some of the worlds tallest mountains. It dragged me through some of the worlds wettest and most mosquito-ridden places and sent me venturing across some of the largest deserts on earth, but the inner journey has always been what drove me. It inspired me to seek out who I thought I was, unconsciously pulled me along when I wanted to give up and gave me strength in ways that I have never known and yet, still never understood. It feels like the inner journey is now where the path leads.

 

With that quote to get you thinking, here’s the video of Chris and his bike touring adventures.

 

Posted in Video